buffy day 1

Week of Buffy: Day 1, An Introduction of Sorts

In which, I embark on a 7 (or so) day journey into the infamous Buffy-verse, discussing anything and everything I want, as I want it. First, an introduction of sorts…

Through seven years of syndication, the great codex of the Buffy-verse has grown into a gargantuan repertoire of comedy, drama, and cinematic artistry, wielding a pervasive cultural significance, and documenting the cultural growth of a generation. While I don’t believe that its creator, Joss Whedon, had any intention of creating something of such cultural relevance, I do believe that by writing, thinking, and creating honestly he tapped into the life-blood of not only my generation, but the foundation of all generations that follow.

The Scooby Gang, about season 5 I think.
The Scooby Gang, about season 5 I think.

Given the sheer girth of the Buffy-related works, this week-long adventure is sheer folly. Each entry in this journal will be about some different aspect of either a specific episode, a collection of related episodes, or perhaps wandering thoughts on a random topic inspired through watching this television show. Going into this, I’m very excited about certain seasons, and certain episodes, but also seeing this series again through a new lens and fresh perspective.

Scooby Gang, season 4. Probably.
Scooby Gang, season 4. Probably.

The very first mission statement of the show was the joy of female power: having it, using it, sharing it.

Joss Whedon first realized his Buffy the Vampire Slayer content in movie form, in 1992, in a serviceable comedy featuring early 90s pop icons Kristy Swanson and Luke Perry. Growing up, I enjoyed the movie for the pop-trash that it was. Going into the television show much later, I found the content much less frivolous. The main character was a strong woman, using her strength to protect people, as Joss says: “The very first mission statement of the show was the joy of female power: having it, using it, sharing it”. Buffy becomes a deep and textured character, and each story embodies a new, strong element of dealing with life and growing up.

Not a great film, but interesting pop trash. Whedon spoke out against it on more than a few occasions.
Not a great film, but interesting pop trash. Whedon spoke out against it on more than a few occasions.

Tomorrow: The Zeppo. For real.

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